Final

Final

Reading response

According to LukeW, Sturgeon’s Law states that the easy way to do things is to make them crappy. However, if you flood the market with “crap” then eventually the users will revolt and demand / circle in on the good. That being said, we looked at the competition apps and figured out ways to better the experience so that our user could be easily persuaded to convert to the MySpot application. Not to mention you could always bad mouth your competition in the process  of persuasion. Haha…

Market Maturity is heavily depends on phasing. For our MySpot application, we have several phases to help our clients / users adapt to the product and eventually the new infrastructure. Phase 1 would be users just use the MySpot app to check the parking lots for spaces, creating efficiency and timeliness. Phase 2 would be inserting the MySpot poles with their input devices on the farther lots, giving students the ability to reserve spots for a certain fee. Phase 3, as the percentage of smart phone users goes up, so do the percentage of lots that have the ability to reserve parking until eventually every lot on campus is a MySpot parking lot.

The Kano Model  talks about having happy customers. Very much like banks who offer prizes for certain investments, MySpot could have the ability to randomly distribute free one day parking passes as a raffle of sorts. Or maybe “park 10 times, get one free!” type of deal. Excitement generators are the best way to get a potential client interested in a product, so MySpot should be able to be flexible enough to do so too.

MySpot should also have a feedback system that once a year asks for the reflection of its users, maybe even rewarding the completion of a survey with a free parking pass for a day. The feedback would be valuable to improve usability and interaction.

Home screen

Home screen

A certain number of parking spaces are reserve-able for a fee.

For example; say you are running late for an important exam, and want to be sure you have a space by the time you get to school/work. You would find a lot near your destination with available reserve spots, then tap on Make a Reservation. If you’ve inputted your billing information in the settings screen, you can automatically charge your card and reserve a space. When you arrive at the space, you will input a confirmation code.

Apparatus mock up.

The map view automatically changes to reflect the parking pass type of the user. Lots show the number of vacant spots and reflect the general availability in color.

App settings screen.

App settings screen.

The first time you load the app, you’re greeted with a login screen (for parking-pass-holding students and faculty). Guests can also use the app to view only pay-to-park spaces. Then follows a short tutorial for using the app.

Mock ups from mid-review.

Wireframing/Paper prototype user testing.

Wireframing/Paper prototype user testing.

Design 674; Adam & Norm

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Design 674